Call It A Comeback: Three Shows I Hope Cash In On The Revival Trend

Last PSA, I explored the ongoing trend of TV show reboots. I talked about Girl Meets World, Fuller House, and Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life. (I also recently started binge-watching Prison Break for the first time, which will be returning next spring with a short sequel season. As addicted as I am to Michael Scofield’s pretty face these days, I’ll likely be tackling that topic soon too.) Anyway, I’m concluding this theme with three shows that I would love to see come back somehow.

Buffy

Buffy is my second favorite TV show of all time. It somehow managed to straddle the line between drama and comedy, action and romance, sci-fi and reality. Buffy Summers had a fictional calling, but she made it feel so very real. You wouldn’t think a show about werewolves, witches, demons, and “the forces of darkness” could make you laugh so hard your sides hurt or bring tears to your eyes, but Buffy managed to do both. Even though Buff was no longer the chosen one nor was she living on a Hellmouth by the series end, the potential is still there for some sort of whopping evil showdown that would force the Scoobies back together for a reunion special. My fingers (and toes) are crossed for the possibility. Continue reading

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Top Five TV Power Couples

“Power couple” is a phrase thrown around rather often these days, particularly in pop culture. You’ve probably heard it applied to Brad and Angelina (accurately). Barack and Michelle (obviously). Kim and Kanye (painfully). It assigns a higher status to two influential people who are romantically linked—while giving them an impossibly annoying nickname—and using their combined prestige to make a difference, or, in Kimye’s case, make headlines. I don’t think it can apply to just anyone though. When I think of power couples, I envision those with actual power. It’s a little easier to pinpoint them within entertainment and they run especially rampant in television. So I’ve compiled a short list of my favorite characters whom I believe perfectly encapsulate the notion of the power couple.

Rick & Michonne
The Walking Dead

Rick and Michonne

Romance is rare in the zombie apocalypse, so it’s pretty refreshing when a new coupling makes their first move. Richonne just seemed like something all of Tumblr was screaming for but might not ever happen (like Caryl, though I’m still gunning for that one), but now it’s actually real. At the end of episode 6.10 “The Next World,” Rick and Michonne are chatting about their day “honey, I’m home” style and some impulsive hand-holding quickly leads to other things. The next day, Rick tells Carl “this is different.” And it feels different. Andrew Lincoln and Danai Gurira have both said in interviews that living in Alexandria and being in a place where they finally feel confident in their safety and their ability to survive has led them to remember that there’s more to life than stabbing, shooting, and slicing walkers on the reg. They’ve recognized something in each other that makes sense and it’s an organic acknowledgement of feelings that perhaps they just didn’t have time to accept before. It was a great moment and now that they’re official, it puts them at the top of my list. Nobody screams “power couple” more than the ringleader and the samurai—the couple that slays together stays together. Continue reading

Saddest TV Deaths (IMO)

[SPOILERS for the following shows:
Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Glee, Grey’s Anatomy, One Tree Hill, Parenthood]

Don’t ask me why I was in the mood to get morbid for this PSA. Maybe because it’s the day before Halloween. Or maybe because a lot of the shows I’m watching are showing a lot of death this season—The Walking Dead, American Horror Story: Hotel, How To Get Away With Murder, heck, even Nashville has been killing people off. Whatever the reason, I started thinking back on all the beloved characters I’ve had to say goodbye to in the past. There have been more than you’d ever hope to endure, but here are five that left me devastated. (Yes, I know TV is fiction, but sometimes it feels real!) And again, spoilers, spoilers, spoilers! If you’ve never watched the listed shows and maybe someday plan to (all five are currently streaming on Netflix), you’ve been warned.

Please excuse the oh-so-crappy video clips.
People are obsessed with making terrible music videos, but never actually just posting a scene, as is, to YouTube.

Continue reading

Best Bad Boys of TV | Vol. 2

Just in case you missed my last PSA, let’s refresh:

You gotta love a good bad boy. That quintessential television character always seems two-dimensional on the page until they get fleshed out into living, breathing, brooding boys who don’t want your heart but you’re still compelled to yank it from your chest and give it to them anyway. It’s up to the actors who play them to let their softer side show through just enough to make you love/hate them and look forward to the next time they grace your screen. I shuffled through my long list of favorite shows in my head and realized that almost every single one had one of those leather jacket-wearing, motorcycle-riding, look-me-in-the-eyes-and-swoon kind of guys. So this topic is going to be broken into segments and we’re going to explore it over the next couple PSAs. (Because I said so.)

Last time, I covered characters from AMC’s megahit The Walking Dead, as well as ‘90s classic Boy Meets World and ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy.

Next up:

Jesse Pinkman | Breaking Bad
Played by
Aaron Paul

Jesse

Jesse broke bad alright, the very instant he decided to let Walter White sweep him up in a blue haze of thug deals and crystal meth production. A drug-dealing addict, Jesse was kind of a low life to begin with and Walt didn’t exactly help matters much—instead, he turned him into a murderer. While his literal partner-in-crime had next to no redeeming qualities by the end of AMC’s smash hit series, at least Jesse had the decency to show remorse and a desire to leave the biz in his rearview mirror—leaving me cheering when he finally did. Continue reading

Then & Now: Charlie Weber

In my prior post about How To Get Away With Murder, I dove into how I know the cast members:

The cast isn’t all unfamiliar faces (for me). I immediately recognized “the puppy” Wes Gibbins as none other than Harry Potter’s Dean Thomas AKA Alfred EnochMatt McGorry, who plays Asher Millstone—the resident jughead—is CO John Bennett inOITNB. Keating’s wing-woman Bonnie Winterbottom is played by Liza Weil, whom I know as Rory’s gal pal Paris Geller in Gilmore Girls. And this one took some IMDb sleuthing, but my mind was blown to discover that Keating’s other associate, Frank Delfino the student seducer, played by Charlie Weber, was demi-god Glory’s better half in season five of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.

Just in case you didn’t believe me about that last one, here’s the proof …

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Charlie above as foxy Frank in 2014. Now check him out sans beard as baby-faced Ben 14 years ago below.

See it now?

Ben_Buffy_the_Vampire_Slayer

The proof is in the profile!

P.S. Here, click this for fun. 

Five Favorite Finales

I hate goodbyes. As a couch potato, I never want to see good TV come to an end. As I once said to my sister, “I love TV! It’s like a movie that never ends!” Not entirely true, as even the longest-running shows have to end eventually. May sucks. Not only do you have nothing to look forward to each night, but sometimes favorite shows reach the end of their lifespans for good. Which got me thinking about some of the finales that always punch me in the feels—or make me want to punch the writers. So, in the order in which they broke my heart, here are five finales that I look back on fondly … and one, er, not so much.

(Warning: Serious SPOILERS ahead!)

1. Boy Meets World
May 5, 2000: “Brave New World”

1-BMW

The two-part finale to my all-time favorite show, although disjointed and lacking continuity from a storyline perspective, was a fitting send-off to the TGIF sitcom. It was one of those perfect hour-long clip episodes that took you back through everything you knew you loved about the show. Seven seasons’ worth of favorite moments play at rapid speed, so even though the show ends in tears, at least it has the good form to give you 45 minutes of hysterical laughter first. (The Eric montage is my personal fave—and, of course, the Feeny Call.) My heart starts to pound a little when they step into the classroom because I know what’s coming … and then, the very second the music dips into that three-staccato-note melody and Mr. Feeny tells them to believe in themselves … dream … try … do good … the tears are already flowin’. I cannot handle this finale, no matter how many times I’ve seen it. I learned more from that man than I ever did from any teacher in my own life, so I feel their pain as they say goodbye to him. That final scene is brutal, especially coming from a show that went heavy on the silly humor and light on the heavy stuff for seven seasons. I’m a sobbing mess by the time Cory says, “You’ll always be with us. As long as we live, OK?” (Because truth.) And when Feeny finally says those final words? Oh, it hurts so good.—DT Continue reading